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How To Install a Toilet

Continued from page 1

Next, flush the toilet. Hold down the handle to drain as much water out as possible. Now you can disconnect the hose from the tank. You may be able to do this by hand. Otherwise, use a pair of slip-joint pliers to loosen the nut. Have a small container ready to catch the water from the hose and fill valve.

Because of the weight and size of two-piece toilets, it is advisable to remove the tank from the bowl. Typically the tank is secured to the bowl by two or three bolts through the bottom of the tank. Remove as much of the remaining water from the tank by absorbing it with a sponge or towel.

Because the tank bolts spend most of their lives under water, they may be fairly grimy or corroded (don't won't - they were only exposed to fresh water). You will have to loosen the screw inside the tank while holding the nut under the bowl. This is one task where having an assistant may be required. However, if you can secure a pair vise grips to the nut, you may be able to do this by yourself. As you loosen the tank bolts, any water left in the tank will spill onto the floor. Placing a towel on the floor behind the bowl will help to contain the mess.

If the tank bolts will not loosen because the nuts are corroded in place, try spraying the nuts with some penetrating oil. Give the oil some time to work and then give it another try. If they still hold fast, then you will probably have to cut the tank bolts. One option is to use mini-hacksaw to saw between the bolt head and the tank or the nut and the bowl. Most bolts are brass and not too difficult to saw through. Be sure to use a metal cutting blade. Another option is to drill out the tank bolt. make sure the work area is dry before using power tools. To drill out the bolt, you will need a metal cutting drill bit of the same diameter as the tank bolt. You should drill at low speed and keep the drill perpendicular to the ground. Start drilling in the exact center of the bolt head. Drill down about half an inch. This will weak the bolt enough that you can pry up the head or easily cut it off with a mini-hacksaw. Be careful to drill straight down, if you hit the ceramic tank material, you may damage it beyond repair.

With the tank bolts removed, you can now lift the tank off of the bowl. Set the tank onto a large towel to avoid damaging the finish of the floor.

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